Michigan

  • Where: Ann Arbor, Dearborn, Detroit
    When: June 16-19, 2015

    Freedom of Information: The Power of Connectivity for Social Change

    What do six strangers living under brutal regimes in the Middle East and an internet programming prodigy from Chicago have in common? Greg Barker's We Are The Giant and Brian Knappenberger's The Internet's Own Boy: The Story of Aaron Swartz document stories on opposite sides of the world but both reveal the potential of the internet as a powerful tool for change. 

    Film Forward collaborates with the University of Michigan Library and Michigan Theater for a week-long program dedicated to exploring the theme “Freedom of Information: The Power of Connectivity for Social Change”. Filmmakers Razan Ghalayini (Producer, We Are The Giant) and Brian Knappenberger (Director, The Internet's Own Boy: The Story of Aaron Swartz) will visit Ann Arbor, Dearborn, and Detroit for a series of screenings and engaging discussions centered on this monumental issue of our time.  

    We Are The Giant follows six individuals on the front lines of the Arab Spring as they struggle to practice non-violence as an effective means to Revolution. Their compelling stories are publicized through social media allowing the entire world to witness their peaceful battle for change. The Internet's Own Boy is a personal story about Aaron Swartz, a young internet pioneer who, from an early age, has been recognized among top members of the field as a prodigy. Swartz, a strong activist for the freedom of online information, finds himself in a two-year legal battle with the U.S. government that will determine the future of open-access laws in our country.

    Schedule Of Events

    All events are free and open to the public. No ticket required. Seating is on a first come, first served basis.

    Tuesday, June 16: Dearborn and Ann Arbor
    7:00pm We Are the Giant
    Discussion with producer Razan Ghalayini to follow the screening.
    Arab American National Museum
    13624 Michigan Ave, Dearborn, MI 48126

    7:00pm: The Internet’s Own Boy: The Story of Aaron Swartz
    Discussion with director Brian Knappenberger to follow the screening.
    Michigan Theater
    603 East Liberty Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48104

    Wednesday, June 17: Ann Arbor
    4:00pm: Open Access Activism
    Panel discussion of The Internet's Own Boy: The Story of Aaron Swartz with director Brian Knappenberger, U-M Library's Lead Copyright Officer Melissa Levine, and U-M  Associate General Counsel Jack Bernard. 
    Library Gallery, Hatcher Graduate Library, University of Michigan
    913 S. University Avenue, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 

    7:00pm: We Are the Giant
    Discussion with producer Razan Ghalayini to follow the screening.
    State Theatre
    233 S State Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48104

     Thursday, June 18: Detroit 
    7:00pm: The Internet’s Own Boy: The Story of Aaron Swartz 
    Discussion with director Brian Knappenberger to follow the screening.
    Allied Media Conference, Community Arts Auditorium, Wayne State University
    450 Reuther Mall, Detroit, MI 48202

    Friday, June 19: Detroit
    8:00pm: We Are the Giant
    Discussion with producer Razan Ghalayini to follow the screening.
    Allied Media Conference, DeRoy Auditorium, Wayne State University
    5203 Cass, Detroit, MI 48202

     

     

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  • Program Collaborators

    The University of Michigan Library
    The University of Michigan Library is one of the largest library collections in the world. Its mission is to support, enhance, and collaborate in the instructional, research, and service activities of the faculty, students, and staff, and contribute to the common good by collecting, organizing, preserving, communicating, and sharing the record of human knowledge. This mission is accomplished through the provision of the various collections and programs available to patrons of the library system.

    Michigan Theater
    The historic Michigan Theater is an example of a community’s vision, creativity, and determination succeeding over the bleakness of decline, indifference, and decay. It was conceived through active community involvement and has been sustained by a unique mix of cultural programming and dynamic community support. Open 365 days a year with over 230,000 people attending events annually, the theater has evolved to become a key economic and cultural anchor in Ann Arbor.

    Venues

    Allied Media Conference 
    The Allied Media Conference emerges out of 17 years of relationship-building across issues, identities, organizing practices and creative mediums. Since the first conference (then the Midwest Zine Conference) in 1999, people have been compelled by the concept of do-it-yourself media. Every year networks of social justice organizers, artists, educators and technologists make the AMC their point of convergence to share skills and develop strategy. Participation in the AMC has grown from 600 people in 2007 to nearly 2,000 in 2014 with increased numbers of young people, queer people, people of color and low-income communities participating. Roughly 35% of participants come from Detroit with the remainder traveling to Detroit from hundreds of cities and towns across North America for the events and screenings taking place on campus at Wayne State University in Detroit.

     

     

     

     

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