Tennessee

  • Where: Nashville
    When: April 8 – 14, 2011

     

  • Install Flash

  • Program Collaborators

    Nashville, TN
    Traveling from east to west across Tennessee, three distinct cultural regions present themselves. In the east, the Appalachian Mountains and its rich storytelling traditions are kept alive at the International Storytelling Festival in Jonesboro. Venturing west, Middle Tennessee brings more rolling hills and plateaus closely identified with Nashville and country music. Upon reaching the Mississippi River, the land opens up and the road leads to Memphis, famously known as a center for the blues. What connects these different cultural regions is a shared commitment to nurturing their cultural traditions and institutions.

    Nashville’s foreign-born population more than tripled in size between 1990 and 2000. It also has the largest Kurdish community in the United States. These changes prompted the Nashville Public Library and the Frist Center for the Visual Arts to partner on Project Access, an Institute of Museum and Library Services funded program that combines art and storytelling to help immigrants share their experiences and improve their language skills. Both organizations are working with Film Forward and the Belcourt Theatre to connect with Nashville’s growing international community.

    The Belcourt Theatre
    The Belcourt Theatre is a nonprofit film house dedicated to presenting the best in independent, foreign, documentary, and repertory work as well as extending the film-going experience through ongoing education programs. The Belcourt is committed to high quality film exhibition practices, connecting audiences to great filmmaking with the goal of building community and film fans through the power of shared experience. The programming includes Kids Court (children's programming on Saturday mornings), the International Film Series, and academic speakers and panels. The Belcourt has been involved with the Art House Convergence, an annual meeting of art houses that grew out of the Sundance Institute's Art House Project.

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